kalexander's blog

Rising Stars’ Lesser-Known Hits: A Playlist

By Jessica MischnerSouthern SoundsJune 30, 2015

There’s no shortage of big time musicians who have gotten their start at Eddie’s Attic, an old-school listening room in Decatur, Georgia. The Indigo Girls, the Civil Wars, Jennifer Nettles, and John Mayer have all proven their singing and songwriting mettle on the venue’s small stage.

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Southern Milkshakes—With A Grown-Up Kick

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 29, 2015

Andrew Ullom handles dessert for half a dozen of the best restaurants in Raleigh, North Carolina, but he doesn’t overthink a milkshake. “When you have three or four ingredients that taste good by themselves, nine out of ten times they’re going to taste good together,” says the executive pastry chef for Poole’s Diner, Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, and several other spots owned and operated by chef Ashley Christensen, who has been one of the driving force behind the city's dining scene for the past decade.

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A Vintage Father’s Day Cocktail

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsJune 21, 2015

Beyond the Father’s Day gifts and cards, there’s a simpler way to pay tribute to dad: Raise a glass in his honor. And what better way to toast a true original than with the most classic of classic cocktails—the Sazerac. Though the drink itself dates back to 1830s New Orleans (when it was made with cognac and absinthe), this 1940s version reflects the recipe’s evolution over the years, blending rye whiskey, bitters, cane syrup, and Herbsaint, an anise-flavored liqueur made in the Crescent City following the nationwide ban on absinthe in 1912. “The Sazerac is a perfect metaphor for a Southern gentleman,” says chef Paul Fehribach, who grew up just across the river from Louisville, Kentucky, in Indiana, and now serves heirloom Southern fare at Big Jones restaurant in Chicago. He turned to that recipe to inspire the one in his recently released The Big Jones Cookbook. “It’s a very masculine cocktail, with a perfect balance between the summery sweetness of Herbsaint and cane, and the temperamental heat of whiskey. When I think of my dad on Father’s Day, he’s on the golf course. What better way to tee off a round or two?”

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A Bucket-List Barbecue Joint Goes Up in Flames

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 11, 2015

Last week, pit master Bryan Furman of B’s Cracklin’ Barbeque in Savannah, Georgia, served crowds larger and hungrier than any he had ever seen before. Not only was he profiled as one of five pit masters serving real-deal barbecue in the June/July issue of Garden & Gun, and included on our Barbecue Bucket List, but Southern Living had also named his joint one of the best in the region, and local media had followed suit. The sudden attention amazed the former welder, who traded his torch for tongs less than a year ago.

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Where to Get Crawfish Online Before They’re Gone

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsJune 5, 2015

The bad news is, crawfish season is drawing to a close. The good news is, there’s still time for one last boil and the cost of mudbugs is low enough to make the occasion more sweet than bitter. After topping out at nearly $7 per pound in early February, mail-order prices have plummeted to as low as $2.15 per pound. So save some newspaper, chill a few cases of beer (the hoppier, the better), and order up a next-day delivery. Oh, and invite some friends—at these prices, you can afford to share. 

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Catching Up with the Lee Brothers

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 5, 2015

2015 has been a busy year for Matt and Ted Lee. The Charleston, South Carolina–raised brothers, cookbook authors, and mail-order entrepreneurs have kept a pretty low profile since they published The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen to critical acclaim two years ago. But in the next few weeks, they will debut a television series and host a two-night stage show with chef Edward Lee (no relation) of 610 Magnolia and MilkWood restaurants in Louisville. We sat down with the brothers between flights to learn a little bit more about Southern Uncovered, which premieres on June 14 on the Ovation Network, and “The Boiled Peanut Hour,” coming to the Actors Theatre of Louisville on June 19-20.

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Discover North Carolina Barbecue

By Jed PortmanGood EatsMay 28, 2015

It’s safe to say that diners today know more about barbecue than any previous generation. Once, we ate whatever was nearby. Now, we drive hundreds of miles to visit the likes of Snow’s BBQ in Lexington, Texas, and Scott’s Bar-B-Q in Hemingway, South Carolina. But amid the big names are hundreds of joints that have yet to earn national recognition. Sometimes for good reason, and sometimes only for lack of traffic or promotional funds. Those hole-in-the-wall spots have a friend in Amanda Fisher, who traveled across North Carolina with partner and fellow barbecue enthusiast Paul Bright to find the 434 joints on the Great NC BBQ Map, a guide to regional legends and hidden secrets alike.

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First Listen: Indigo Girls

By Jessica MischnerSouthern SoundsMay 26, 2015

It’s been four years since the Indigo Girls released an album. Happily for their fans, the wait for a follow-up is over. On June 2, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers will release One Lost Day, a 13-track record filled with the harmonies and emotionally crafted lyrics for which the Girls have become famous. There’s “Happy in the Sorrow Key,” a sonically resplendent meditation on life and loss. “With the death of my dad in late 2013, my whole world shifted and many songs I had started took on a different feel and urgency,” Ray says. “This is one of them. Musically, I was inspired by the feel of Paul Weller and The Jam, but then I also wanted this big orchestral bridge to mirror the feeling of laying in my bunk at night on the tour bus and drifting off to sleep scared but in awe of the process of life.” “The Rise of the Black Messiah” marries rhythms of mandolin, drums, and bass with lyrics inspired by the story of a man wrongfully convicted and put to death in prison to create a narrative tour de force (imagine Bob Dylan’s “Hurricane” as an even angrier protest anthem). But the album—the girls’ 14th—has lighter moments, too. “Elizabeth,” a sweet old-fashioned love song, “is the story of kinship and music and whiskey,” Saliers says. “It’s an homage to New Orleans and a distant love that began there.”

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Alton Brown's Favorite Southern Road Eats

By The EditorsGood EatsMay 15, 2015

If you are hitting the road this summer and looking for recommendations on where to eat, Alton Brown has a few suggestions. The Atlanta-based bestselling author, James Beard Award winner, and television personality travels (and eats) for a living. His traveling variety show, Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour had him crisscrossing the country and, as you might imagine, he had many good meals along the way.  

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A Master Class in Floral Design

By Elizabeth HutchisonBelow the LineMay 14, 2015

Maybe you’re a spring bride and want to do your own flowers for your big day. Or perhaps you’re thinking about ditching a corporate gig and making a career in the floral business. Or maybe you just like puttering in the garden shed. Whatever your motivation, floral designers Heather Barrie of Gathering Floral + Event Design and Anne Dabney of Stems can help.

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