A Tree With Deep Southern Roots

The longleaf pine towers over some of the South's most beautiful landscapes

  • + Expand Caption

    “Rocket stage,” a vulnerable age for young longleaf. After spending time storing energy, a grass-stage juvenile expends it on a frantic growth spurt. If it can get its terminal bud above the next fire’s flames, it significantly increases its chance of survival. Solon Dixon Forestry Center, Andalusia, Alabama.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    Wiregrass at Fort Bragg. Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    A stand of white-topped pitcher plants (Sarracenia leucophylla). The several groups of Southeastern insect-eating plants--pitcher plants, sundews, and butterworths--are closely tied to low-nutrient acidic bogs. They gain nutrients from their carnivorous habits. Splinter Hill Bog Preserve, Baldwin County, Alabama.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    Because humans began clearing and altering the forest long before anyone recorded it, we may never know the full extent of longleaf pine's range. Recent research indicates that longleaf's range may have been even more extensive than shown here.

  • + Expand Caption

    This is the third longleaf forest to grow here. The old growth was cleared in the eighteenth century to grow indigo and other crops on working rice plantations but slipped back into forest. The second forest was cut as timber, and the third forest prospers as a preserve. Georgetown County, South Carolina.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    Quail hunting is deeply involved with longleaf, and the loss of the open, seed-rich longleaf habitat is the prime cause of poor hunting. Longleaf Plantation, Newton, Georgia.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    A manageable fire in a regularly burned longleaf area, more typical of a traditional or well-maintained fire regime. Blackwater River State Forest, Milton, Florida.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    Mixed-age longleaf with wiregrass understory. Spring at the Wade Tract, Thomasville, Georgia.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    The equestrian forest. The ability to move freely in the open landscape has always been one of the longleaf forest’s attractions. Walthour-Moss Foundation Property, Southern Pines, North Carolina.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    Hen turkeys patrol the longleaf. Ichauway, Jones Center, Colquitt, Georgia.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger), the great monkey-like squirrel of the longleaf forest. Hitchcock Woods, Aiken, South Carolina.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

  • + Expand Caption

    A diversity of small oaks is associated with some longleaf tracts. Here, turkey oak, dwarf running oak, blackjack oak, and bluejack oak flourish. November at Hobcaw Barony near Georgetown, South Carolina.

    © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

Longleaf, Far as the Eye Can See (University of North Carolina Press), a new book from conservationists Bill Finch, Beth Maynor Young, Rhett Johnson, and John C. Hall, pays tribute to a tree that's been a fixture in the Southern forest for centuries. These photographs are a sampling of more than 150 in the book, taken everywhere from the Florida wetlands to the hills of northern Alabama.

>Click to read more

Photos from LONGLEAF, FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE: A NEW VISION OF NORTH AMERICA'S RICHEST FOREST by Bill Finch, Beth Maynor Young, Rhett Johnson, and John C. Hall. Copyright © 2012 by the University of North Carolina Press. Photographs © 2012 by Beth Maynor Young. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu
 

Comments