Food & Drink

Cajun Coush-Coush

A cornmeal cousin to grits from Southwestern Texas

photo: Sandy Wilson


Louisiana may be better known than Texas for Cajun food, but it can’t claim a monopoly. Oil rig jobs in the 1900s drew Louisiana families to the southeastern corner of Texas known as the “Golden Triangle.” They brought their foodways with them, including this cornmeal cousin to grits, made savory with bacon grease and sweet with cane syrup. “This is a simple breakfast and one of the old family recipes from the area,” says author and chef Terry Thompson-Anderson.


Recipe from Terry Thompson-Anderson, excerpted from Breakfast in Texas: Recipes for Elegant Brunches, Down-Home Classics, and Local Favorites


Ingredients

    • 2 cups yellow cornmeal

    • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

    • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    • 2 teaspoons baking powder

    • 1 tablespoon sugar

    • 1/2 cup bacon drippings

    • 1 1/2 cups boiling whole milk

    • Butter, cane syrup (such as Steen’s), or half-and-half for topping


Preparation

  1. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the cornmeal, salt, pepper, baking powder, and sugar; toss with a fork to blend. In a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat, heat the bacon drippings until almost smoking. Pour the boiling milk into the cornmeal mixture and stir to form a smooth paste. Spoon the mixture into the hot fat and fry until a light crust forms on the bottom, about 10 minutes. Stir the mixture, breaking up the crust and distributing the browned bits throughout.

     

  2. Reduce the heat to medium and continue to cook an additional 10 minutes, without stirring. To serve, scoop a portion of the coush-coush into individual bowls. Top with your choice of butter, cane syrup, or half-and-half. Serve hot.

Recipe from Terry Thompson-Anderson, excerpted from Breakfast in Texas: Recipes for Elegant Brunches, Down-Home Classics, and Local Favorites


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