Recipes

Weekend Menu: Steven Satterfield's Spring Onion Pizza

By Jed PortmanGood EatsMarch 20, 2015

Blame Paula Deen. Or heck, let's leave her out of this for once. Blame generations of well-meaning chefs and cooks who have defined Southern cooking with adjectives like battered, fried, buttered, and smothered, rather than the most important one of all: fresh. Steven Satterfield, of Miller Union in Atlanta, isn't the first chef to make the case that our diet is rooted in garden soil. But in his new cookbook, he presents a vegetable-centric cuisine that is as appealing in its restraint as a salt-and-peppered slice of tomato, particularly as we lift our heads from the larded stew pots of cold months past to nibble on new harvests of asparagus, peas, and strawberries. Root to Leaf is divided by season, and the spring chapter contains such uncomplicated creations as this spring onion pizza, made with a wholesome whole wheat dough.

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How to Make a Collard Sandwich

By Jed PortmanGood EatsMarch 11, 2015

When Glenn and Dorsey Hunt piled collard greens between pucks of cornbread a decade ago, the fair food vendors from Robeson County, North Carolina, created a new regional classic.

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How to Make Chicken Mull

By Jed PortmanGood EatsFebruary 24, 2015

“I’ve been eating chicken mull from the time I could eat anything,” says Charlotte Griffin, the mayor of Bear Grass, North Carolina. In Martin County, people credit her grandfather with the simple porridge, thickened with crackers and seasoned with salt, pepper, and chile flakes.

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The South's Other Favorite Tea

By Jed PortmanGood EatsFebruary 17, 2015

Russian Tea is not from Russia. At least, not Russian Tea as we Southerners know it. The giftable dry mix that is the stuff of countless mid-century community cookbooks dates back to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when American urbanites sipped black tea with lemon and sugar in imitation of upper-class Russians. Within decades, so-called Russian Tea, which was by then often doctored with clove and cinnamon, washed down chicken salad and mixed nuts at meetings of bridge clubs and church groups across the South. In the transformative years following World War II, the basic formula of hot tea with citrus became a showcase for the convenience foods of the Space Age: Tang, powdered lemonade, instant tea. And there, at last, is the Russian Tea we all know and love—layered with love in a Mason jar, and tastefully tied with grosgrain or gingham.

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Make this Now: Bayou Horchata

By Jed PortmanGood EatsDecember 23, 2014

Tis the season for milky refreshments of all sorts, from creamy eggnog to clarified milk punch. For Bobby Heugel, co-owner of the bar the Pastry War in Houston, it’s horchata season. Well, it’s always horchata season. Heugel deploys the pearlescent rice milk liberally at the Pastry War, a modern mezcaleria where aguas frescas and sal de gusano meet small-batch spirits on a menu of high-concept Texas Mexican cocktails.

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