Recipes

A Legendary Summertime Punch

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsJuly 6, 2015

In the 1740’s, a Virginia diplomat recorded what is believed to be the first mention of Fish House Punch, a colonial-era concoction, which originated at America’s oldest fishing club, in Philadelphia, and was a favorite of George Washington’s. Nearly three hundred years later, Atlanta mixologist Miles Macquarrie stumbled upon the nearly forgotten recipe in an old cocktail manual. At his Decatur bar Kimball House, he hews closely to that original formula, combining a potent mix of rum, brandy, and peach liqueur (he makes his own from fresh Georgia fruit, but a high-quality store-bought schnapps works just fine, too), sweetened with lemony sugar, then diluted with cold tea and water. “I discovered this years ago and never felt the need to change it,” he says. “Plus, everybody loves it—hard not to.”

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A Last Supper for Seven Sows

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 3, 2015

“This is a celebration, not a funeral,” says Mike Moore, who is on vacation with a group of his former employees at a rented beach house outside of Charleston, South Carolina, instead of on the line at Seven Sows, his recently shuttered Asheville restaurant. For the past two years, as the streets around the restaurant filled with new spots to eat and drink, it was a comfortable place to pick over a plate of buttermilk hush puppies or a tray of raw oysters. But the chef has been busy with other projects, and he was ready to sell when a friend asked if he would.

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Toast the Preakness with a Black-Eyed Susan

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsMay 15, 2015

Despite the mint julep’s high profile, the Derby isn’t the only Triple Crown race with its own cocktail. The Preakness has a signature libation, too. And at Baltimore’s annual post-run Winners Circle Wind Down, the Black-Eyed Susans taste a little different. That’s because Woodberry Kitchen mixologist, partner, and Director of Operations Corey Polyoka applies his restaurant’s regional, farm-driven ethos to the Preakness’s official cocktail. Instead of vodka—traditionally the drink’s primary spirit—his recipe uses Breuckelen rye. “I love rye and try to use it whenever I can for the historic tie,” he says. “So much rye has been made in the area in the past, and it’s starting to be produced around here again.” Rum goes in, as usual; Polyoka sources his from Lyon Distilling in nearby St. Michaels. Lightly acidic verjus, the sweet-tart pressed juice of unripened grapes, replaces store-bought sour mix (you can buy it here or you can sub in a mixture of lemon and lime juice), and pitted cherries add sweetness. “This version hits that same tropical note as the original,” Polyoka says, “but it’s more balanced and technique-driven.”

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