Southern Style

The Southern Home Sourcebook

Instant classics for every room––even the garden––from a gifted group of Southern designers, artisans, and craftspeople

August/September 2015

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It takes one of the four craftsmen at Brian Boggs Chairmakers fifty hours to create this ladder-back rocking chair by the firm’s eponymous designer. Every detail of the indoor rockers, from the unusual slats to the woven Shaker tape seat, adds to their comfortable, timeless shape—making each commissioned chair an investment. Available in ash, cherry, walnut, maple, or oak ($4,200 each; brianboggschairmakers.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

Sweet Dreams
An Alabama-made bed, crisp linens from Texas, and a hand-loomed North Carolina coverlet make for a cozy sanctuary

BED: Alabama’s Andrew Reid, of Reid Classics, is a third-generation craftsman who inherited his predecessors’ gift for reproducing antiques—from nineteenth-century spindle beds to this eighteenth-century pencil post model (from $3,100; reidclassics.com).

BEDDING: Bailey McCarthy launched her Texas-based line, Biscuit Home, in 2012 and ever since has been printing updated takes on classic Southern florals as well as hotel-style bedding, with its bold color borders (black shown), at a mill in South Carolina ($250 per set; biscuit-home.com).

COVERLET: North Carolina weaver Jessica Green of A Little Weather is bringing the art of hand looming to a new generation. Though the technology may be old, unexpected colors such as bright yellow, turquoise, and green lend her designs a beautifully modern look ($500–$940; alittleweather.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

KNIVES: Every workplace needs a workhorse—and in the kitchen, it’s a good knife. Self-taught Austin, Texas, artisan Travis Weige of Weige Knives takes that hardworking concept to heart in crafting blades. To ensure the ultimate degree of customization, Weige sends soft clay templates of his knife handles to clients before he begins carving (from $475; weigeknives.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

TABLEWARE: Texas ceramist Keith Kreeger’s work has attracted a loyal following, including the buyers at Bergdorf Goodman and renowned chef Sean Brock, who just ordered pieces for the tables at Husk Nashville. The porcelain Hudson collection features organic shapes capped by free-form glazed bands ($44–$395; keithkreeger.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

BACKSPLASH TILES: Hand pressed and hand cut, every piece of tile by Tennessee designer Lindsay Meacham of Red Rock Tileworks is charmingly irregular. From vintage-inspired subway tiles to geometric shapes, they’re available in forty-eight colors and three finishes. Meacham accepts orders for custom colors and styles specific to historic renovations, too (from $21 per square foot; redrocktileworks.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

FARM TABLE: “When I make a farm table, I think of the generations to come that will sit around it,” says Charleston, South Carolina, furniture designer Brian Hall of Kistler Design Co. Hall gives the traditional piece a sophisticated spin with the sleek legs of his design, which is available in cherry, mahogany, alder, and walnut (shown; $4,100–$5,200; kistlerdesign.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

Perennial Favorites:
Wooden arbors, topiaries, and planter boxes from North Carolina bring order to any landscape

Concord, North Carolina, designer Kate Morrison of Eastover Collection creates some of the South’s finest classic garden accents. She collaborates with a team of woodworkers who build each piece and finish it with a choice of three colors—white, black, or Charleston green—or a custom hue. Just add a few Southern plantings, such as Confederate jasmine, English or American boxwood, or citrus, to complete the elegant picture ($350–$4,500; eastovercollection.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

DOOR KNOCKER: The pineapple has long been a symbol of welcome in the South, so it’s a natural element with which to greet guests right at the front door. Virginia designer Jack Goehring of Jefferson Brass Company studied colonial examples to perfect the shape of his door knocker ($140; jeffersonbrass.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

CHANDELIER: The handmade lighting designs Julie Neill creates in New Orleans come in an array of spectacular forms, from the hand-gilded crystal Juliette chandelier (shown), from the made-to-order collection, to completely bespoke pieces—such as one-of-a-kind lanterns designed for Brennan’s restaurant ($1,200–$10,000; julieneill.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

FRAMING: “My great-great-great-grandfather Marie Adrien Persac was a Louisiana artist who mapped the Mississippi River from Natchez to New Orleans,” Susan Tynan says. But when she took a copy of one of his maps to a frame store, the result disappointed her. That experience led her to create Framebridge in Maryland. The process is simple: Her company sends a prepaid label and packaging for your pieces, and once the work is framed in one of twenty-five styles, it arrives on your doorstep ready to hang ($75–$159; framebridge.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

FABRIC: Virginia interior designer Lauren Liess hired the artist Kat Wright to depict the graceful magnolia blossom for her curtain- and pillow-perfect linen fabric. The overscale print is available in six colors: chartreuse (shown), yellow, orange, China blue, pink, and true ($120 per yard; laurenliess.com).

photo: Andrew Cebulka

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