Rise & Dine: The South's Best Breakfast Joints

Whether you’re craving corned beef hash, quail and eggs, or just need a hangover cure—stat—we’ve scoured the South for the best places to get the day started right

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The Southern Agenda: August/September 2014

Goings-on in the South and beyond »

Better Burger Toppers

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 28, 2014

In his professional life, chef Tim Byres spends an awful lot of time standing over hot embers. Smoke, his five-year-old restaurant in Dallas, takes its name from the smoldering arsenal of cookers out back: a smokehouse, a smoker, and a wood-fueled grill. Even when he’s not on the clock he mans the tongs at home and on family camping trips. This is a man who knows how to grill a burger. And the secret to a great one, he says, isn’t the cuts of beef involved, or how they’re ground. It’s a solid roster of quality homemade condiments. Upgrading to a garden-fresh ketchup or a smoky chile mustard is that extra bit of effort that can take a Labor Day spread from run-of-the-mill to something you’ll still be remembering when the long holiday weekend is long gone.

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Make This Now: Korean-Southern Ribs

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 28, 2014

With all due respect for tradition, there's plenty of room for growth in barbecue, as writer John T. Edge noted when he visited Heirloom Market BBQ on his recent tour of Atlanta’s Korean restaurants. The hybrid dishes on the menu at Heirloom Market—one of two Korean-Southern restaurants that chef Cody Taylor runs with his wife, former pop star Jiyeon Lee—are certainly attention-grabbing: Your grandmother probably didn’t dose her slaw with kimchi, and chances are you’ve never seasoned pork butt with gochujang paste, a fermented slurry of chiles, rice, and soy that's popular on the Korean peninsula. Cooked with love by comfort food enthusiasts from different parts of the world, though, the fare makes perfect sense. The ribs at Heirloom Market benefit from a very literal meeting of cuisines: a Georgia-style dry rub and a sweet, Korean-style barbecue sauce flavored with gochujang and Sprite.

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Video Premiere: Lera Lynn's "Out to Sea"

By Jed PortmanSouthern SoundsAugust 25, 2014

The intimate, quivering twang in Lera Lynn’s vocals might bring to mind another, better known Lynn. But the Nashville-based singer-songwriter is not necessarily a country musician, she says, at least not according to the modern-day definition. “Out to Sea,” from her upcoming album, The Avenues (out September 9), is a track that bears some resemblance to her adopted hometown’s famous honky-tonk laments, carried along by airy harmonies and slide guitar, but it's also kin to the independent sounds of Athens, Georgia, where she cut her teeth.

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The South's Friendliest...Phone Book?

By CJ LotzBelow the LineAugust 20, 2014

The small city of Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, is a community so tight-knit, the phone book lists residents’ nicknames.

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Cocktail Hour: Bourbon Root Beer Float

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 18, 2014

Rob McDaniel met Will Abner for the first time in a field in southwestern Virginia. They were both at Lambstock, shepherd Craig Rogers’s bacchanalian annual gathering of farmers, chefs, bartenders, and other food-and-beverage types. "I was finding wood sorrel and wild shiso in the fields up there. Will just started making cocktails with it. I thought, 'That’s pretty cool,'" says McDaniel, who runs the kitchen at SpringHouse in Alexander City, Alabama. "When I went back to the restaurant, I said to our front-of-house manager, 'We’ve really got to talk to this guy.' He was just slinging drinks then, you know, at some bar that closed at three a.m."

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Stocking a Farm-to-Table Bar

By Jed PortmanGood EatsAugust 14, 2014

At the beginning of the summer, the bartenders at Woodberry Kitchen in Baltimore began to run out of verjus, the tart juice of unripe grapes. At nearly any other bar in the country, a shortage of an ingredient like verjus might mean a gentle shift in the menu. At Woodberry, it meant a complete renovation of the cocktail program.

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Southern Food Group: Greens

By Sara Camp ArnoldGood EatsAugust 4, 2014

The Southern Foodways Alliance and Garden & Gun decided to rewrite the food pyramid in 2014 by introducing the twelve Southern food groups. Thus far, we’ve covered oysters, gumbo, boudin, fried chickenbarbecue, and hot tamales. Now, we're taking Mom's advice and eating our greens— turnip, mustard, cabbage, and collard. And while greens are common on Southern tables, here are two unusual takes on the staple ingredient you may not have tried before.

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Get On Up: The James Brown Story

By Jessica MischnerSouthern SoundsAugust 1, 2014

It’s one thing to try to be like James Brown. Everyone from Bootsy Collins to Michael Jackson to Justin Timberlake has cited the Godfather of Soul’s enduring creative influence. But actually stepping into those patent leather shoes to try to be James Brown—well, that’s a different measure of daunting altogether. Fortunately, Chadwick Boseman loves a challenge. Under the direction of filmmaker Tate Taylor (The Help), the actor embodies the unshakeable ambition and charisma of the Hardest Working Man in Showbusiness as the breakout star of Get On Up, the James Brown biopic that hits theaters nationwide today. 

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New Frozen Treats Popping Up

By Lindsey ReynoldsGood EatsJuly 30, 2014

Five years ago, Mexican-inspired paletas were either a novelty or just plain unheard-of down South. Today, almost every Southern city is home to locally owned, artisanal popsicles with seasonal flavors. Many are so successful they’ve opened their own storefronts, and some are even crossing state lines. Since some of these folks peddle their wares on two-wheeled bike carts, we recommend stalking their social media channels for their up-to-date locations.

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Why Meatballs are "Texas Mexican"

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJuly 29, 2014

Tex-Mex cuisine has taken its share of slings and arrows over the years. Truthfully, Adán Medrano has no real issues with processed cheese or greasy refried beans. But in his recent cookbook, Truly Texas Mexican, the San Antonio native outlines a different kind of Texas cooking, with recipes that rely upon fewer—and fresher—ingredients. Medrano’s history of what he calls “Texas Mexican” food begins centuries before the first Europeans set foot in the United States, with the simmering beans and roast wild chiles of the tribes that first inhabited the Lone Star State, and continues into the homes of families across the Southwest today—including his own

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