Daily Shot

Eating Appalachia with Fred Sauceman

By Jed PortmanGood EatsApril 17, 2014

Have you ever tried an Arvil Burger, or sipped a cup of the Hotel Roanoke’s peanut soup? Probably not, but you’d better believe that Fred Sauceman has. The roaming journalist, filmmaker, and professor at East Tennessee State University has left nary a small town or holler untouched in his lifelong quest to catalog the foods of the Southern mountains.

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An Easy Easter Almond Cake

By Elizabeth HutchisonGood EatsApril 17, 2014

Mississippi baker and James Beard Award–winning cookbook author Martha Foose has a knack for letting simple flavors shine. Her recipe for a traditional almond cake is a showstopper of a dessert—the kind that leaves friends and family clamoring to know the secret. But you don’t need to be a Paris-trained pastry chef like Foose to pull it off. An almond cake is the rare dessert that’s almost impossible to mess up.

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The Home Bar Heats Up

By M.K. QuinlanBelle DecorApril 16, 2014

Judging from the slew of serving carts, free-standing bars, and bottle-friendly armoires at last week’s High Point market, it seems home entertaining is more popular than ever. Held bi-annually in High Point, North Carolina, the market offers a sneak peek at new furniture designs, which means home bartenders will have lots of options this year for serving spirits in style. 

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Bonus Photos from our April/May 2014 Issue

By The EditorsA Southern FocusApril 11, 2014

Often when we send an issue of Garden & Gun off to print there are several photos we wish we could have included. The same is true of our April/May 2014 issue, so we picked ten of our favorites that couldn't make it to print to share with you online.

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The New Hickory Stripe

By M.K. QuinlanBelle DecorApril 9, 2014

Hickory stripe has long been synonymous with durable workwear. Though it was originally used as a cover for pillows and mattresses (the thick fabric prevented feathers from poking through), industrious railroad wives began making caps and other clothing out of the textile. Before long, it caught on with farmers, mechanics, and others who needed clothing that could hold up to hard use.

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