Good Eats

Southern Classic: Daube Glacé

By Jed PortmanGood EatsDecember 18, 2014

While country ham and salami are hardly foreign to New Orleans these days, they were rarities in the along the Gulf Coast two centuries ago. “We can’t hang meats outside here. They rot,” says Isaac Toups, who runs the kitchen at Toups’ Meatery. In the years before the advent of refrigeration, locals had to find other ways to keep the pantry stocked.

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A Forgotten Southern Sandwich

By Jed PortmanGood EatsDecember 9, 2014

On a cool night in early 1931, J.D. Holland parked his car near the Farmers’ Café in Statesville, North Carolina, and went inside to eat dinner. He walked back to the vehicle no more than twenty minutes later to discover that a thief had broken in. As Holland took stock of his belongings, however, he realized that the burglar had overlooked some treasures in favor of two rib-sticking staples: peanut butter and mayonnaise. “Inferring that the food was taken by some one who was really hungry, Mr. Holland stated today that he would like to get in touch with the fellow and he would take pleasure in giving him a full meal, free of charge,” the Statesville Record and Landmark reported.

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The Secret to Amazing Buttermilk Biscuits

By Jed PortmanGood EatsDecember 2, 2014

Most every biscuit maker has a secret ingredient. For some, it’s the family biscuit bowl, worn through by years of use. For others, it’s a spoonful of mayonnaise in the dough, or salt sprinkled over the rounds. My secret ingredient came from an unlikely place: the Swedish province of Scania, home to food writer and butter evangelist Margit Richert.

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Cheerwine for the Holidays

By Jed PortmanGood EatsNovember 25, 2014

In Salisbury, North Carolina, Cheerwine has the sort of following that jam bands and football teams might envy. The cherry soda has called Salisbury home since 1917, and it is the essential ingredient in a favorite local libation: Cheerwine punch, a generally non-alcoholic blend of soda, pineapple juice, and ginger ale that graces tables all over town during the holiday season, over ice or with sherbet. This year, for the first time, the rest of the Carolinas can get in on the good times with Cheerwine Holiday Punch, a bottled version of the party drink.

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Boudin: A Taste of Cajun Country

By David ThierGood EatsNovember 18, 2014

Whether eaten sitting on the hood or sucked out of its casing while searching for some easy-to-miss dirt road, the best accessory for boudin is a car. Often purchased from a convenience store, an over-air conditioned family-run butcher shop, or gas station, the French-named seasoned pork and rice sausage occasionally makes its way to upscale restaurants all over the country, but it’s still rare to see it outside of Louisiana, and preeminent American food writer Calvin Trillin has a notion why:

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Greg Baker's Encyclopedia of Florida Food

By Jed PortmanGood EatsNovember 11, 2014

If your knowledge of Florida food stops at stone crab and citrus, you’re not alone. Greg Baker, of the Refinery in Tampa, has been one of the first chefs in the state to celebrate a rich but  underexplored cuisine built by a diverse collection of characters from a crowded history: barbecue-loving natives, Spanish conquistadors, enslaved Africans, indentured servants from the Mediterranean, swamp-dwelling subsistence farmers, and many others. Next month, he’ll open Fodder & Shine, a restaurant inspired by the history of Florida food—especially the make-do staples of the so-called Florida Crackers, descendants of the state’s earliest white settlers. Expect to see some of these dishes and ingredients on the menu.

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New and Noteworthy: Barbecue on a Stick

By Jed PortmanGood EatsNovember 6, 2014

Within the grease-spotted, sugar-dusted pages of coverage that accompany state fair season each year, you’ll find plenty of treats intended more to shock than to nourish. It’s safe to say that the deep-fried gummy bear and the doughnut cheeseburger will not become staples of the American diet anytime soon. One new state-fair creation, though, just might be able to hold its own away from the flashing lights and carnival barkers.

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The Most Southern Beers on Earth

By Jed PortmanGood EatsNovember 5, 2014

Sean Lilly Wilson, the forty-four-year-old founder of Fullsteam Brewery in Durham, North Carolina, can claim an unusual honor. To the best of his knowledge and ours, he is the only brewer who has ever designed a beer specifically for drinking with fried chicken. Not just any fried chicken, either. His Beasley’s Honey White, a witbier brewed with oats, black pepper, and local honey, is a collaboration with chef Ashley Christensen, made to complement the honey-licked bird at her Raleigh restaurant Beasley’s Chicken + Honey (click here for Christensen's recipe).

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Virginia is for Apple Lovers

By Elizabeth HutchisonGood EatsOctober 30, 2014

Pippin, York, Winesap, and Pink Lady—grab a bushel of Virginia apples while you still can. This weekend is officially last call for you-pickers at many Commonwealth orchards like Carter Mountain and Stribling. Even if you can’t make it to the field, there are plenty of other ways to savor fall’s sweetest flavor for weeks to come.

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Snapshots from the Southern Foodways Symposium in Oxford

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsOctober 29, 2014

In addition to the intellectual highlights of the 17th Annual Southern Foodways Symposium—talks on Hispanics in the kitchen by Randall Keenan, the importance of Mardi Gras Indians by Pableaux Johnson, the state of restaurant integration in Washington, DC, by Todd Kliman, and more—there was a nearly endless supply of soul-filling, pants-tightening meals and snacks, all set against the backdrop of a crystalline autumn weekend in Oxford, Mississippi. Here's a behind-the-scenes look at the event.

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