Good Eats

A Perfect Southern Match: Tomatoes & Biscuits

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJuly 24, 2015

Leave it to Willie Foster of Biscuit King’s Fun Barn in Fairhope, Alabama, to make the tomato sandwich on our cover into a why-didn’t-we-think-of-that breakfast treat. The self-taught baker’s signature Ugly Biscuit is an all-in-one meal of sausage, bacon, egg, and cheese tucked into a football-shaped lump of dough that appeared in our 2014 roundup of the best breakfast joints in the South. But while visiting family in the Holy City earlier this week, he treated the Garden & Gun staff to an off-menu special.

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An Asheville Chef's Southern Lox

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJuly 10, 2015

Steven Goff loves lox on a bagel with cream cheese. But like many other chefs, he is also an advocate for locally farmed and foraged ingredients, and salmon don’t swim anywhere near Asheville, North Carolina, where Goff has lived and worked for more than a decade, most recently at the acclaimed King James Public House. “I don’t like to use ingredients from too far away, and salmon are incredibly far away,” he says. “What we do have here is great trout.” Goff cures fillets in a mixture of North Carolina sweet potato vodka, dill, citrus, and spices, and serves the resulting lox over bagels and salads. Made with freshly caught fish, it’s delicious enough to make a person forget salmon lox altogether.

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A Legendary Summertime Punch

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsJuly 6, 2015

In the 1740’s, a Virginia diplomat recorded what is believed to be the first mention of Fish House Punch, a colonial-era concoction, which originated at America’s oldest fishing club, in Philadelphia, and was a favorite of George Washington’s. Nearly three hundred years later, Atlanta mixologist Miles Macquarrie stumbled upon the nearly forgotten recipe in an old cocktail manual. At his Decatur bar Kimball House, he hews closely to that original formula, combining a potent mix of rum, brandy, and peach liqueur (he makes his own from fresh Georgia fruit, but a high-quality store-bought schnapps works just fine, too), sweetened with lemony sugar, then diluted with cold tea and water. “I discovered this years ago and never felt the need to change it,” he says. “Plus, everybody loves it—hard not to.”

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Hitting the Sweet Spot: Vintage Southern Summer Treats

By Elizabeth HutchisonGood EatsJuly 2, 2015

Even when you’re well past the days of three-month-long school breaks, there’s something about summer that makes you want to indulge like a kid. And while endless hours by the swimming pool may have given way to nine-to-five careers, you can still relish the simple joy of a red-white-and-blue firecracker pop on a hot July afternoon. Across the South, there are those timeless family-run institutions that make you forget you ever learned what a calorie was. If you’re traveling this summer, check out five of our favorite nostalgic sweet spots:

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Southern Milkshakes—With A Grown-Up Kick

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 29, 2015

Andrew Ullom handles dessert for half a dozen of the best restaurants in Raleigh, North Carolina, but he doesn’t overthink a milkshake. “When you have three or four ingredients that taste good by themselves, nine out of ten times they’re going to taste good together,” says the executive pastry chef for Poole’s Diner, Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, and several other spots owned and operated by chef Ashley Christensen, who has been one of the driving forces behind the city's dining scene for the past decade.

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A Vintage Father’s Day Cocktail

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsJune 21, 2015

Beyond the Father’s Day gifts and cards, there’s a simpler way to pay tribute to dad: Raise a glass in his honor. And what better way to toast a true original than with the most classic of classic cocktails—the Sazerac. Though the drink itself dates back to 1830s New Orleans (when it was made with cognac and absinthe), this 1940s version reflects the recipe’s evolution over the years, blending rye whiskey, bitters, cane syrup, and Herbsaint, an anise-flavored liqueur made in the Crescent City following the nationwide ban on absinthe in 1912. “The Sazerac is a perfect metaphor for a Southern gentleman,” says chef Paul Fehribach, who grew up just across the river from Louisville, Kentucky, in Indiana, and now serves heirloom Southern fare at Big Jones restaurant in Chicago. He turned to that recipe to inspire the one in his recently released The Big Jones Cookbook. “It’s a very masculine cocktail, with a perfect balance between the summery sweetness of Herbsaint and cane, and the temperamental heat of whiskey. When I think of my dad on Father’s Day, he’s on the golf course. What better way to tee off a round or two?”

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Southern Classic: Tomato Pudding

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 17, 2015

It is an incredibly simple dish, even for the down-to-earth likes of Robert Stehling.

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A Bucket-List Barbecue Joint Goes Up in Flames

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 11, 2015

Last week, pit master Bryan Furman of B’s Cracklin’ Barbeque in Savannah, Georgia, served crowds larger and hungrier than any he had ever seen before. Not only was he profiled as one of five pit masters serving real-deal barbecue in the June/July issue of Garden & Gun, and included on our Barbecue Bucket List, but Southern Living had also named his joint one of the best in the region, and local media had followed suit. The sudden attention amazed the former welder, who traded his torch for tongs less than a year ago.

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Record-Breaking Sweet Tea

By CJ LotzGood EatsJune 10, 2015

June 10 is National Iced Tea Day, which we Southerners understand to mean National Sweet Tea Day.

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Where to Get Crawfish Online Before They’re Gone

By Jessica MischnerGood EatsJune 5, 2015

The bad news is, crawfish season is drawing to a close. The good news is, there’s still time for one last boil and the cost of mudbugs is low enough to make the occasion more sweet than bitter. After topping out at nearly $7 per pound in early February, mail-order prices have plummeted to as low as $2.15 per pound. So save some newspaper, chill a few cases of beer (the hoppier, the better), and order up a next-day delivery. Oh, and invite some friends—at these prices, you can afford to share. 

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